Image by Etienne Girardet

circular economy

The outdoor industry is trapped in a linear economic system which drives consumerist habits and destroys our planet. We need to change the status quo and shift to a more circular mindset before it's too late. 

THE LINEAR STATUS QUO

The economic model currently at large in the outdoor industry is the linear economy.

 

Here's how it works:

Image by Rodion Kutsaev

take

Raw materials are collected

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make

Transformed into products

dispose

Products discarded as waste at end of life

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The linear model places an enormous burden on the ecological balance of our planet. All three steps of the “take-make-dispose” mentality affect ecosystem services in different ways. The collection of raw materials leads to high energy and water consumption, emissions of toxic substances and disruption of natural capital such as forests and lakes. Product formation is also often accompanied by high energy and water consumption and toxic emissions. Eventually, when these products are discarded, space is taken up from natural areas and toxic substances are often also emitted. (PBL Netherlands, ‘Using planetary boundaries to support national implementation of environment-related sustainable development goals’)

CONSUMERISM: AT WHAT COST?

The linear economy also fuels consumerism. We are trapped in a cycle where outdoor brands are continually producing more products year upon year which they then have to flog on to the consumer. It's no wonder we are constantly bombarded to buy new outdoor products everywhere we look, the linear economy model depends on us buying stuff!

 

But do we really know the true cost of our addiction to consumerism? As outdoor enthusiasts we have a unique relationship with the natural world so we can no longer ignore the environmental impacts of what we buy. 

Every second, the equivalent of a rubbish truck load of clothes is burnt or buried in landfill

WE HAVE ENOUGH CLOTHES ON PLANET EARTH TO CATER FOR THE NEXT SIX GENERATIONS

The fashion industry produces more carbon emissions than all international flights and maritime shipping combined

A CIRCULAR FUTURE

Circular economy is a different system in which we can re-balance our relationship with the natural world. 

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Image by Michael Aleo

'A circular economy is a bigger idea than incrementally reducing the harm of our current model'

Ellen Macarthur Foundation - Vision of a circular economy for fashion

Unlike a linear economy model, the concept of a circular economy is that economic activity builds and rebuilds overall system health.

 

A circular economy for outdoor gear and clothing will be founded on the basic principles of: (i) eliminating waste and pollution; (ii) keeping products and materials in use: and (iii) regenerating natural systems.

A lot of the noise on circular economy is being made by large brands who are using recycled materials in the production of new clothing or equipment. We think this misses the mark because it is framing circular economy within our existing linear model which still relies on a continual production of new products. 

We need to think broader.

Image by v2osk

At bluebird, We think increasing the product lifecycle of our outdoor gear is the most impactful way to participate in circular economy

 We think that the most impactful (and arguably the simplest) way to participate in circular economy is through simply using our outdoor products more. The problem is, it will require us, as a community, to completely rethink our relationship with our gear.  But we think we are up to the challenge.

Our framework relies on three basic concepts:

1

re-use

Re-using gear is the most direct way of keeping it in circulation for it's maximum lifecyle. Second-hand should become the new 'new' 

2

repair

It is all too easy to ditch a 'broken' product and buy new these days. We need to bring back repair and keep our treasured items going for longer to reduce their impact and  the need to buy more stuff.

3

share

Our attitude to ownership perpetuates consumerism which in turn causes massive environmental damage. If we were to share our outdoor gear more we need not all purchase an item we use for one day a year. 

These concepts are a simple yet effective way to reduce the environmental impact of our outdoor gear.

As environmental enthusiasts we have a unique relationship with the natural world. We therefore feel we have a unique opportunity to completely change our relationship with our gear to minimise our environmental impact. 

Time to get started.

Image by FERESHTEH AZADI

'increasing the product lifecycle of an item by nine months can reduce its waste, water and carbon footprints by up to 30%'

WRAP -Valuing our clothes